Close

October 24, 2019

Why creativity is hard to find but worth the effort

by Morgan Lee, storyteller & wordsmith

He’s not going to do “that” again is he? Surely, he’s seen, like thousands of us onlookers, that “that” is not going to work – again. The competition has seen it, prepared for it and has already negated “that,” making him look ill-prepared and amateur in the process.

But, yep, he’s only gone and done it again. And now all we on the outside can do is moan, wonder “why?” and try our best to pick up the pieces.

If you think I’m referencing marketing practices, you’re absolutely right. But if you thought I was talking about the vicissitudes of being a sports fan, you’re absolutely right again.

It’s amazing the parallels that athletic competition and every-day life share. As a longtime sports journalist turned marketing writer, I myself have been surprised by the similarities in marketing and sports.

For instance, the best and most successful leaders find ways to mix things up, both by following and leading trends – in all walks. Whether you’re reading through marketing practices and website design choices or determining whether you want to stick with an antiquated gridiron offense while “imposing your will” on the opposition or changing with the times to keep defenses guessing while creating match-up problems, it’s very much the same.

The best leaders and companies find ways to get creative while keeping competitors guessing, all the while wowing the audience and earning what in sports are referred to as “style points.” Of course, those style points have to be backed up with substance and steel. But if you build your company and marketing plan on solid foundations, then you will have created something truly special. It’s not easy, and some trial and error will necessarily be involved. But it can certainly be done. What it requires, whether you’re a coach, marketing coordinator or vice president of sales, is a commitment to flexibility, backed by a clear vision. That means creativity. And those that foster and commit to a creative atmosphere will rarely regret it in the longterm.